The Pharisee And Tax Collector

Date:

Share post:

The Doctrines Of Imputation And Federalism

The Parable of the Pharisee and Tax Collector

If we are like the Pharisee, how can we change?

Right doctrine helps. Is God our divine helper, granting us the ability to become good, or is he our Divine Savior, granting us his goodness? If God gives us our own personal goodness and accepts us based on that, it makes sense for us to look down upon others. But if God gives us righteousness through his Son, and only through his Son, then we have no right to look down upon others. We are all equal. We all need the righteousness of Christ.The gospel tells us not that God gives us our own personal righteousness but that he gives us Christs righteousness. The theological term is imputation. Imputation means to attribute something to ones account. This is what God does to us with Christs righteousness. John Piper clarifies.

“Imputation” is different from “impartation.” God does “impart” to us gifts and fruits of the Holy Spirit, so that we have them and they are in us growing and they are ours. But all of that gracious impartation through the Spirit is built on an even more firm foundation, namely, imputation – the work of God outside of us: God’s own righteousness, not imparted to us, but imputed to us. Credited to us, as Romans 4:6 and 11 say. Put to our account. Reckoned to be ours.

The Bible tells us of three imputative events throughout history. First, Adam imputes his sin to all mankind. Second, God imputes the sins of the elect to Christ. Third, God imputes the righteousness of Christ to the elect.

Way To Introduce The Story:

Use a fine waterproof marker to draw a face on a balloon. Blow up the balloon slightly so that the balloon looks like the head of a child. Children, let me introduce you to Puffy. Puffy really likes to brag about herself. Sometimes she says things like, Dont I look beautiful today? Sometimes she tells her mum, Mum, you have to buy me lots of presents because I am the nicest person in our whole family. Think of more things Puffy might say to compare herself with others. and keep adding more air until the balloon finally pops. Oh, no, Puffy just thought too much of herself. She spent too much time trying to compare herself with others. In todays lesson, Jesus talks about a man who liked to compare himself with other people. Lets learn about this parable . . .top

Children’s Sermon: The Pharisee And The Tax Collector

Every child at some time in their life has played with building blocks. I still remember the fun I had as a child building different things from these blocks. One thing that I remember very well is that I used to enter into a contest with another child to see who could build the tallest tower. The one who could stack up the most blocks without their tower falling was the winner. Did you ever play that game?

I thought it might be fun to play the tower game this morning. Here is the way we will play. For every good thing weve done, I will add a block. Lets see if I can build this block high enough to reach heaven. Let’s see, where shall I start?

Crash! Well, my tower got just a little too tall, didn’t it?

Jesus taught His disciples that whenever people think they are so good that they dont need God, they are headed for a fall!

Pick up two blocks and use them to tell the story. One block will be the Pharisee and one will be the Tax Collector. Hold up the appropriate block while you talk.

Jesus told about two men who went to the temple. A temple is like a church. One of the men bragged about all of the great things he did and thanked God that he wasn’t like those other sinners in the temple.

The other man, instead of bragging about how great he was, humbly asked God to forgive him for all of the times he failed to be the kind of person that God wanted him to be.

This man knew that he could never do enough good things to be as high as God. This man knew that he needed God.

Don’t Miss: When Does Tax Season End 2022

The Tax Collectors Humility

The tax collector in contrast understood his sinfulness and unworthiness. He understood that on his own he had no hope.

The irony of the story is the Pharisee was in the same boat. While he might look good on the outside he was just as sinful on the inside . He needed mercy too. But he couldnt get past his pride to see his need.

We all need Gods mercy and grace. But unless we humble ourselves we will never see it OR receive it.

Rather than justifying our sin and comparing ourselves to others we need to come to God with humility. And when we do that God will not just forgive us he will exalt us.

So, one final time. Who do you relate to? The meaning of Luke 18:9-14 asks us this questions. Spend some time thinking about how you can take the tax collectors posture and rid yourself of the Pharisees pride.

The Parable Of The Pharisee And The Tax

Foundations of My Faith: The Pharisee and the Tax Collector

The gospel lectionary reading for the so-called Last Sunday after Trinity in Year C is Luke 18.914, the parable of the Pharisee and the Tax-collector. We are now in the thick of distinctively Lukan material. There are various claims as to how many of Jesus parables in Luke are unique to this gospel, varying from 12 to 17 I think it rather depends on how you define a parable, and I have not yet found a definitive list.

The Wikipedia page on the Parables of Jesus suggests 14 unique to Lukes gospel the table to the right here from Mark Allen Powell supports this. Allen Powells table does show how extensive this Lukan section of Jesus journey to Jerusalem isand note that all but one of the unique parables occurs in this section.

Once more, Luke introduces the parable with his own comment on why Jesus told it. This is distinctively Lukan: he has already done this for the previous parable and does it again soon after and I dont think this happens anywhere in Matthew or Mark. Two questions arise: why does Luke includes such explanatory comment? And is he correct in his explanation?

It is striking how many of Jesus stories and parables, particularly in Luke, include two contrasting figures even when there are three or ten they divide clearly into two options. It seems as though a consistent feature of Jesus teaching is that there are two ways without any middle ground, so that we are provoked and challenged to decision.

Recommended Reading: Filing Taxes As An Llc

The Meaning Of Luke 1: 9

Now that weve looked at the parable of the Pharisee and the tax collector, lets look at what the meaning of Luke 18:9-14 is for us today.

In the last verse of this parable Jesus tells us what the application is: I tell you that this man, rather than the other, went home justified before God. For all those who exalt themselves will be humbled, and those who humble themselves will be exalted. Luke 18:14

Ironically both men got what they prayed for. The tax collector humbly asked for mercy, and he received it. The Pharisee asked for nothing because he thought that he already had it all, and he received nothing.

The parable of the Pharisee and the tax collector shows us whose prayers God respects. Its not those who appear righteous and exalt themselves, but rather those who humble themselves because they see how sinful they really are.

The reversal of this story doesnt seem shocking to us today as it would have for Jesus audience. But it should, at least a little bit.

We like to point the finger at the Pharisee, but the reality is we probably have a little of his attitude in our hearts as well. And this parable should cause us to pause and reflect, who are we more like?

The Lesson Of The Pharisee And The Tax Collector

Jesus then tells His audience what they needed to learn from this story: I tell you, this man went down to his house justified rather than the other for everyone who exalts himself will be humbled, and he who humbles himself will be exalted .

The tax collector was not justified by any of the deeds of the law, but by his repentant, humble approach before God, by his acknowledgment of sin, and by his faith in God demonstrated by calling upon His mercy for forgiveness.The lesson is that this tax collector went to his home justified . The tax collector was not justified by any of the deeds of the law, but by his repentant, humble approach before God, by his acknowledgment of sin, and by his faith in God demonstrated by calling upon His mercy for forgiveness.

The Bible often speaks of being justified, made free from guilt, by faith. Therefore we conclude that a man is justified by faith apart from the deeds of the law .

Some people think they can be justifiedmade righteous and just and innocent in Gods sightby doing good deeds specified in the law. That was the Pharisees attitude, but it was actually the tax collector who was justified by Gods mercy.

The tax collector repented. He acknowledged he was a sinner and asked for Gods mercy, and he was justified.

Read Also: When Do We Get Tax Returns 2022

Who Do You Relate To

We have a tendency to think higher of ourselves than we ought to. We see ourselves through rose-colored glasses. But the parable of the Pharisee and the tax collector forces us to take off those glasses and see who we really are.

So, who are you more like? The Pharisee and his pride or the tax collector and his humility?

The Parable Of The Pharisee And The Tax Collector Luke 1: 9

Parable of the Pharisee and the Tax Collector

Luke 18:9-14

9 And He also told this parable to some people who trusted in themselves that they were righteous, and viewed others with contempt: 10 Two men went up into the temple to pray, one a Pharisee and the other a tax collector. 11 The Pharisee stood and was praying this to himself: God, I thank You that I am not like other people: swindlers, unjust, adulterers, or even like this tax collector. 12I fast twice a week I pay tithes of all that I get. 13 But the tax collector, standing some distance away, was even unwilling to lift up his eyes to heaven, but was beating his breast, saying, God, be merciful to me, the sinner! 14 I tell you, this man went to his house justified rather than the other for everyone who exalts himself will be humbled, but he who humbles himself will be exalted.

  • What title do you give to this parable?
  • Self-Trust is Misplaced

    You Cant be Good Enough

    Repentance Precedes Justification

    Gods Road to Exaltation

    Measuring by the Wrong Standard

  • What other parables have similar characteristics or theme?
  • Two Builders

    The Wheat and the Tares

    The Dragnet

    The Creditor and Two Debtors

    The Good Samaritan

    The Rich Man and Lazarus

    The Persistent Widow

  • Who was Jesus speaking to when He gave this parable?
  • What was the context for this parable?
  • Jesus is teaching His disciples about prayer.

  • pay tithes of all that I get
  • standing some distance away
  • unwilling to lift up his eyes to heaven
  • beating his breast
  • MH God brings forth good out of evil.
  • Read Also: How Much Is Property Tax In California

    The Difference Between The Pharisee And The Tax Collector

    Die Bibel in Bildern von Julius Schnorr von Carolsfeld. Leipzig: Georg Wigands, 1860. Hathi Digital Trust Library online version of a copy in the Getty Library, courtesy of www.victorianweb.org.

    Disclosure: This post may contain affiliate links, meaning Beautiful Christian Life LLC may get a commission if you decide to make a purchase through its links, at no cost to you.

    The parable of the Pharisee and the Tax Collector is the most theological of all Jesus parables. It is the most theological because it deals with the subject that is of most importance to the life of the Christiannamely, how a man or woman, boy or girl is accepted before God.

    The irony of this parable is that both of these men were going to the Temple to pray. On face value both of them seemed to be praying to the same God. Both men came to the same place of worship. Both were members of the same covenant community. Both were men of the working class. But thats where the similarity ends.

    Jesus loved to draw contrasts in order to drive home kingdom principles and truths. When he sets out these two men, he does so by appeal to their ethical, social and religious standing. The Pharisee was a respected, religious member of the covenant community. The tax collector was a despised and questionable figure in Jewish society. Throughout the gospel records, tax collectors are identified with sinnersa term usually reserved in Jewish society for those known for their sexual immorality.

    The Tax Collector And The Pharisee

    This may come as a surprise to some people, but God is not mad at sinners. Rather, God is mad about us. He loves us.

    What angers God is when someone who thinks theyre spiritual or call themselves religious stand in the way of a sinner coming to believe. We find a story in the New Testament about a sinner who went to pray. This man was a tax collector, and tax collectors were not loved a lot in those days.

    But there also was another person who went to pray that day, and he was a Pharisee. He said, God, I thank You that I am not like other menextortioners, unjust, adulterers, or even as this tax collector. I fast twice a week I give tithes of all that I possess .

    Interestingly, the King James Version describes him as praying thus with himself . I think, in reality, that his prayers didnt go any higher than the ceiling because that wasnt a prayer to God that was a boast.

    Meanwhile, the man who knew he was a sinner simply said, God, be merciful to me a sinner! . Another way to translate it would be, God be merciful to me, the sinner. He knew who he was.

    Jesus said of him, I tell you, this man went down to his house justified rather than the other for everyone who exalts himself will be humbled, and he who humbles himself will be exalted .

    You May Like: South Carolina Income Tax Rates 2021

    The Conclusion Of The Pharisee And The Tax Collector

    In the conclusion of the parable, Christ reminded the audience that everyone who exalts himself will be humbled, and he who humbles himself will be exalted . The tax collector was humble and was in a repentant frame of mind. He was the one justified. The Pharisee was not humble, but was quite proud, and was not justified.

    The Bible often speaks of the need to avoid pride. Notice what Solomon wrote about how God views pride: The fear of the LORD is to hate evil pride and arrogance and the evil way and the perverse mouth I hate . God hates pride.

    But God does give grace to the humble. The apostle James wrote: But He gives more grace. Therefore He says: God resists the proud, but gives grace to the humble . Humble yourselves in the sight of the Lord, and He will lift you up .

    The apostle Peter reiterated the same thoughts: Likewise you younger people, submit yourselves to your elders. Yes, all of you be submissive to one another, and be clothed with humility, for God resists the proud, but gives grace to the humble. Therefore humble yourselves under the mighty hand of God, that He may exalt you in due time .

    The Pharisee and the tax collector were figurative of typical attitudes that are common even in our age today. One man was full of pride and was quite self-righteous. The other was humble he recognized his sins and asked for Gods mercy and was justified. Which one will you be?

    About the Author

    John Foster

    The Pharisee And The Tax Collector

    Art: The Pharisee and the Tax Collector

    He also told this parable to some who trusted in themselves that they were righteous, and treated others with contempt: “Two men went up into the temple to pray, one a Pharisee and the other a tax collector. The Pharisee, standing by himself, prayed thus: ‘God, I thank you that I am not like other men, extortioners, unjust, adulterers, or even like this tax collector. I fast twice a week I give tithes of all that I get.’ But the tax collector, standing far off, would not even lift up his eyes to heaven, but beat his breast, saying, ‘God, be merciful to me, a sinner!’ I tell you, this man went down to his house justified, rather than the other. For everyone who exalts himself will be humbled, but the one who humbles himself will be exalted.”

    You May Like: California Capital Gains Tax Rate 2022

    The Wrong Way To Give Thanks

    Two men went up into the temple to pray, one a Pharisee and the other a tax collector. Luke 18:10

    Most of us talk about thankfulness during the holiday season. But Jesus in Luke 18 tells a parable that teaches us that there is a wrong way to be thankful.

    Luke gives a prologue to the parable in verse 9, He also told this parable to some who trusted in themselves that they were righteous, and treated others with contempt. Jesus told this parable to expose the hearts of his hearers.

    Then the parable focuses on the prayer life of two men, a Pharisee and a tax collector. The parable continues, The Pharisee, standing by himself, prayed thus: God, I thank you that I am not like other men, extortioners, unjust, adulterers, or even like this tax collector. I fast twice a week I give tithes of all that I get.

    The Pharisee began by looking to Heaven but quickly turned to look to his neighbors. The wrong way to give thanksgiving is to give thanks with comparison. He thanks God he is not unrighteous in his business dealings, his relationships, or his marriage. Despite appearing to be a model member of the First Temple of Jerusalem, God was not pleased with his words. His thanksgiving came from a heart that trusted in itself for righteousness.

    The Pharisee didnt simply pray with comparison, but he also gave thanksgiving with contempt.

    Praise the Lord! I will give thanks to the Lord with my whole heart, in the company of the upright, in the congregation. Psalm 111:1 ESV

    Related articles

    Cheapest Place To Get Taxes Done

    Compare Tax Advisor Fees 10...

    Pay My Taxes To Irs

    Am I Eligible For A Waiver Or Reimbursement Of The User...

    Irs Self Employment Tax Calculator

    Qualified Business Income Deduction Calculating...

    Irs Tax Extension 2021 Form

    What Is The 2021 Recovery Rebate Credit ...